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SPECIAL CONCERNS
Alzheimer's & Dementia
About Dementia
Agitated Behavior
- Activities
Clothing & Dressing
Clutter & Hoarding
Falls & Mobility
- Things to Do
- Canes & Walkers
Late Stage
Medications
- Memory Aids
- Mid-Late Stage
Transferring
- Body Ergonomics
- 10 Golden Rules
- What Not to Do
- Lifts
Wandering
Wheelchairs

EXPERT'S TIPS
Not everyone's suited to do personal care, but you can still contribute to the person's life in your own way. There are so many ways to help; for example, you might help financially or offer the primary caregiver some time off.

late stage
Loss, Caregiving, & Comfort


As dementia progresses, the person you care for will need more hands-on caregiving as they lose the ability to take care of themselves. Many caregivers find this a rewarding yet difficult time. Without special equipment and training, it's easy to get overwhelmed with late stage caregiving as the need for help with everyday tasks (bathing, toileting, eating, transferring, etc.) intensifies. Don't go it alone – get help from friends, family, and community resources like the Alzheimer's Association and the Alzheimer's Foundation of America. Therapeutic activities, like listening to music, aromatherapy massage, and visits with pets can soothe and comfort both you and your loved one during this difficult time.

Special Equipment & Training

Throughout our virtual home, you'll find practical tips and strategies that have helped other caregivers in similar situations during the late stages. Below is a list we've put together - organized by key topics - so you can find information more quickly. We know it's not easy – we're caregivers too.

Show me how to:

Deal with incontinence

Give a less stressful bath

Give a bed bath

Prevent bed pressure sores

Transfer the person

Change bed pads

Use a hospital bed

Use a "high-low" hospital bed

Have better mealtimes

Get and/or use a ramp

Prevent falls

VIDEOS

Help - Outside Sources



Power of Music



Sensory Intake



Bed to Wheelchair



Using a Hoyer Lift





PUBLICATIONS




End of Life Care




National Institutes of Health




Late Stage Care




Alzheimer's Association




Hospitalization Happens




National Institutes of Health




OTHER RESOURCES

24-Hour Helpline


Information, referral, support



Alzheimer's Association
1-800-272-3900




Online Care Calendar


Lotsa Helping Hands




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